Chris Anderson is Crossing Borders

Chris Anderson, CEO of 3-D Robotics and former Editor in Chief of Wired Magazine, has been on a quest to reshape the way we think of and use drones since he founded the company DIY Drones.

Anderson imagines a future when these remote controlled aerial vehicles will be more than just military devices but machines that simplify everyday life, with potential uses including fire fighting and pizza deliveries just to name a few.

But more than just his ideas about implementing robotics, makes Anderson’s business cutting edge. About five years ago Anderson partnered with a young Mexican programmer, named Jordi Munoz, to create the multimillion dollar company, 3-D Robotics, that spans San Diego and Tijuana.

Not only did Munoz share some of his impressive code which helped propel the company forward, but he also provided insight into Tijuana’s little known manufacturing hub.

3-D Robotics has tapped  into Tijuana’s underground market of high skilled, low cost manufacturing, which Anderson  refers to as “the Shenzhen[China’s manufacturing epicenter] of North America.”

Anderson’s business is a model for tech companies that require manufacturing that is usually outsourced to China. Tijuana’s close proximity to the U.S. means drastically cheaper shipping costs, and more according to Anderson.

“It’s not just cheap, it’s better skilled. They graduate more engineers. Those manufacturing skills that we lost in much of the United States are still there,“ Anderson tells KPBS.

Could this business in Tijuana be the beginning of a new industrial future for the region?

See what other ideas Anderson has about revolutionizing the tech industry, at this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific. The conference presented by UC San Diego Extension and The Atlantic Magazine will be held at the Scripps Seaside Forum and Qualcomm Institute in La Jolla, California on October 2 through 4.

Please visit atlanticmeetspacific.com for more information.

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Gaming for Better Brains and a Better Future

larry-smarrWhen you think about what videos games teach their users, the first things that come to mind are violence and inactivity. But today there are games that can strengthen skills which can be applied to finding a cure for cancer or combating climate change.

Last year at The Atlantic Meets the Pacific, Larry Smarr, founding director of Calit2 (now know as Qualcomm Institute), and Jane McGonigal,world-renowned designer of alternate reality games and author of the best-selling book “Reality is Broken,” discussed the beneficial side of video games.

Most parents are worried about the potential effects video games have on children but, McGonigal argues that games teach technical proficiency as well as social and collaboration skills.

Larry Smarr says he encouraged his children to play games because he knew it would be important for their future and brain development, as the rapid necessity of making decisions in video games drives neural development.

See what else you can learn from games in this video of Smarr and McGonigal’s discussion.

Be sure to catch Larry Smarr at this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific, presented by UC San Diego Extension and The Atlantic Magazine. The conference will be held at Scripps Seaside Forum and the Qualcomm Institute in La Jolla, California on October 2 through 4.

For more information on registration and speakers, visit atlanticmeetspacific.com

 

Erica Huggins, Production Pro

Erica Huggins graduated with a double major in Anthropology and Documentary Film from Hampshire College. She then spent a year in China and Japan, teaching at Kobe College before she came back to the U.S. to work as a film editor.

She got hired by Interscope Communications, the predecessor of Radar Pictures, when they were looking to add some new, unconventional input to their production process. She landed the job of in-house producer thanks to her editing credits on films like John Waters’ Hairspray and Crybaby.

Huggins worked at Interscope Communications and Radar Pictures for over a decade producing movies including How to Deal, Gridlock’d, and What Dreams May Come which won an Oscar for visual effects.

She then moved on to become the co-president of production at Imagine Entertainment, where she oversees the production of films like Flightplan and J. Edgar as well as brings writers, directors, and ideas together to make a film.

She has many projects in the works right now, such as a movie with Will Smith and The Dark Tower, a film based on the Stephen King novels of the same name.

Watch this trailer of her upcoming film Rush, based on the real life rivalry of formula one racers, Niki Lauda and James Hunt.

Huggins will be speaking at this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific, presented by UC San Diego Extension and The Atlantic Magazine. The conference will be held on October 2-4 at the Scripps Seaside Forum and the Qualcomm Institute (formerly known as Calit2) in La Jolla, California.

For more information on registration, visit atlanticmeetspacific.com.

Mick Ebeling and the Not Impossible

Mick Ebeling graduated from UC Santa Barbara with a degree in political science in 1992. He worked for FUEL, a motion design studio, and became the CEO of THEY, a cross design platform, before he started his own company and organization.

In 2001, he formed The Ebeling Group, a production company specializing in animation and visual effects. With this company Ebeling was involved in the production of films including, “Stranger than Fiction” starring Will Ferrell, “Kite Runner,” and the James Bond 007 film “Quantum of Solace.”

Ebeling has also founded the Not Impossible Foundation, a nonprofit with the intent to foster the collaboration of ideas and people “dedicated to creating low cost, DIY open-source solutions for real people with real needs.”

The Not Impossible Foundation’s first project began when Ebeling befriended Tempt One, a famous graffiti artist in Los Angeles, diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. This paralyzed his entire body, leaving Tempt to communicate only through movement of his eyes.

Ebeling brought together people from Graffiti Research Lab, Free Art and Technology Lab, and openFrameworks to construct a way for Tempt to create his art once again. And on April 10, 2009 Tempt wrote his first piece of graffiti in seven years using the EyeWriter.

Watch Ebeling explain the EyeWriter himself in this TED talk:

The EyeWriter was one of “Time Magazine”’s 50 Best Inventions in 2010. The attention garnered by the EyeWriter gave Ebeling the platform to promote the idea behind the device and the Not Impossible Foundation, that through collaboration and creativity people can accomplish seemingly impossible tasks to drastically improve the lives of others.

In regards to the creation of the EyeWriter, Ebeling is famously quoted saying, “If not now, then when? If not me, then who?”

Don’t miss Ebeling at this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific, hosted by UC San Diego Extension and The Atlantic Magazine. The conference will take place on October 2 through 4 at Scripps Seaside Forum and the Qualcomm Institute (formerly known as Calit2) in La Jolla, California. For more information on registration and speakers like Ebeling, visit atlanticmeetspacific.com.

Laurie Garrett: Polk, Peabody, Pulitzer and Pandemics

Have you heard the latest on the most recent outbreak of bird flu? See what the Council on Foreign Relations’ Senior Fellow on Global Health has to say.

Laurie Garrett is the only writer ever to receive the three “Big P’s” of journalism: the Peabody, the Polk, and the Pulitzer.

Garrett graduated from UC Santa Cruz with honors in Biology; then went to graduate school at UC Berkeley, where she started reporting on science news for KPFA-FM, a San Francisco Bay area radio station. She abandoned her doctoral studies for journalism and in 1977, Garrett won the Peabody Award in Broadcasting for a documentary series she co-produced, called “Science Story”.

After spending a year reporting in foreign hot spots, like the (then) USSR and sub-Saharan Africa, Garrett spent eight years as a science correspondent for Nation Public Radio. Then, in 1988, Garrett went on to the science writing and foreign desks at Newsday, a New York newspaper. In 1996, she received the Pulitzer Award for Explanatory Journalism, amongst many other awards, for her coverage of the Ebola virus outbreak in Zaire. Within the four following years, Garrett was awarded the Polk award twice, first in Foreign Reporting for Garrett’s “Crumbled Empire, Shattered Health” and then in Best Book for Betrayal of Trust: The Collapse of Global Public Health.

Garret has written two other best-selling novels, The Coming Plague: Newly Emerging Diseases in a World Out of Balance and I Heard the Sirens Scream: How Americans Responded to the 9/11 and Anthrax Attacks.

In 2004, Garrett left Newsday to join the Council on Foreign Relations. She now runs the Council’s Global Health Program, serving as the Senior Fellow for Global Health.

Hear Garrett’s perspective on pandemics and how this can relate to the latest in bird flu and other outbreaks.

For more of Garrett’s advice on global health, don’t miss this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific. This third annual conference, hosted by UC San Diego Extension and The Atlantic Magazine will be held October 2nd through 4th at the Scripps Seaside Forum and the Qualcomm Institute (formerly known as Calit2) in La Jolla, California.

For more information on registration and speakers, visit atlanticmeetspacific.com.